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“I’ve been looking at [Keret’s] Substack and it’s so witty and enjoyable, and he’s clearly having a wonderful time doing it, I thought, ‘maybe I could do that’” — Salman Rushdie, The Guardian

The Day After

I wrote the piece below a week ago, when all eyes were on Gaza. I’m writing this introduction in the midst of Iran’s attack on Israel, while I and much of the world gaze at a sky lit up by rockets and drones that may appear like shooting stars, but they aren’t the kind that grant wishes: they only make fears comes true. But even as we look up in fear of Iran, we must remember that Gaza, Netanyahu, and the destructive government he helms are all still here.

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"Intention"

Deep in his heart, Yechiel-Nachman had made peace with his prayers going unanswered. Because prayer was the pure yearning for compassion and justice, whereas life was life: cruel, dispiriting, insulting. It was therefore only natural that two such contrasting worlds could never converge. But on October 7, 2023 – the 22nd day of Tishrei in the year 5784 – something in Yechiel-Nachman broke.

Photograph: Bumble Dee/Alamy

“What About Me?“

Written by Etgar Keret and Shira Geffen for “Short Stories on Human Rights“ (2008).

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Random quote

my legs take me toward the edge of the roof. It's like scratching a wound, like ordering another shot of Chivas when you know you've had too much to drink, like driving a car when you know you're tired, so tired.

"Fly Already"

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Third Temple: Israel’s Occupation Is Coming Home

Netanyahu’s government is not here to debate—it’s here to rule, and any resistance is an intifada.

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Words Without Borders, 2010

I believe that there is a truth. I believe it is very difficult to articulate that truth. I try to go in that direction, but I don’t pretend I will get there.

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New York Times, 2012

For Keret, the creative impulse resides not in a conscious devotion to the classic armature of fiction (character, plot, theme, etc.) but in an allegiance to the anarchic instigations of the subconscious. His best stories display a kind of irrepressible dream logic

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